A Work-Out for Every Kind of Dad

There are many different motivations for working out. A quick survey of our member base found that many of our member dads don’t work out with the goal of fending off or getting rid of “Dad bod.”

“Most of my Dad clients aren’t working out to get a chiseled physique, they are interested in improving overall health and wellness to be able to show up in the best way for their families,” shares Andrew Burlin, Chelsea Piers Master Trainer.

Burlin and Greg Nichols, Chelsea Piers Pier Trainer share their advice for competitive athlete dads, dads who spend most of their time at desk and those that are moving into their senior years.

Read on to learn how for each adding movement, strength, and balance can prevent injury and are progressively sustainable forms of exercise that keep you healthy long term.


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Weekend Warrior

Profile: Former athlete, continuing to compete in sports into older age

Advice from: Greg Nichols Pier Trainer and Warrior Dad

How to stay injury free: 

Weekend warriors should consider proper movement mechanics and optimal range of motion to continue moving well as they get older to prevent injury.

The most important guidance I can provide is to never lift without a proper warm up. The warm up should consist of (preferably) a workout specific movement that assists in getting blood flow to the muscles being used in your workout. Warm up should be between 5-10 minutes at a moderate pace.

After the warm up, use the foam roller, which may be the most over looked tool in the gym, to break up any shortened tissue you may have developed and restore optimal range of motion. Focus on the muscles around the joints you plan on using, failure to do so will result in faulty movement patterns which, over time, can lead to a slew of problems including inflammation and other injuries like herniation. 

Recommended Exercises:

The best exercises to use to build strength are always compound movements. Moving a challenging amount of weight using multiple joints is the best way to stimulate the central nervous system which (when done properly) will result in muscle growth, strength as well as fat loss. Moving the weight with proper form and control is key, if you don't have a trainer, use the mirrors and or your cell camera to assess your form throughout the movement. If you ever need a second opinion, feel free to contact me or if I'm on the floor ask me and I'll give you a look or spot as you perform your reps.

Final Words of Advice:

From one dad warrior dad to another, take care of your bodies! You only get one!!!


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Desk Dad

Profile: Spends most of his time working at a desk , still enjoys recreational sports

Advice from: Andrew Burlin, Master Trainer

How to stay injury free: 

This population suffers from muscular imbalances, which can be attributed to a more sedentary workplace/lifestyle. Combating inactivity with activity is the solution. Adding mobility, balance, and strength through corrective exercise, with an enhanced focus on postural correction is the key for an improved, functional body. 

Recommended Exercises:

Many of my clients are “desk dads” who also play golf or some kind of recreational sport. Adding preventative exercise to avoid injury is necessary. Weight training and implementing mobility and balance gets the body into shape to go from the office to the court/field/course. Learning a proper dynamic warm up for your sport is also key. Most people, men in particular, don’t warm up before their softball game/round of golf. It’s tremendously important to stay healthy and increase efficiency in their game. 

I provide a small group class called Golf Fit. It’s basically a Pre-Tee Time on Saturday morning @ 9am. Basically a workout before heading out on the course Saturday morning. It’s a program I built for my dad, who was experiencing back pain from the amount of golf he was playing and the torque it places on the back, specifically in desk workers. He spent Saturday's and Sunday’s in the gym with me, through the winter (~12weeks), working on this program. When it was all said and done, his handicap went from a 12 to a 10. He’d play 80 rounds of golf a year, his best seasons were after implementing this program. I’ve had a number of moms and dads in the class experience very similar results. 

Final Words of Advice:

Don’t wait, today is the best day to start. The habits you exhibit make the biggest impression on your kids lives. Exercise doesn’t just help your health, but your family’s health collectively.


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Senior Dad

Profile: Retired, 60+

Advice from: Andrew Burlin, Master Trainer

How to stay injury free: 

I also work with the Senior Population. I’m a Senior Fitness Specialist. Balance is the most important aspect of fitness for the older adult. Fall related injuries are the leading causes for hospitalization. Training balance after 60yrs old is necessary to prevent a devastating loss in their ability to avoid injury as they get older. There’s a strong correlation to aging and loss of balance and the more you train, the more you retain. 

Recommended Exercises

The other thing older adults need to focus on is strength and cardiovascular health. Building muscle around joints helps to protect against injury. Building heart health helps defend against heart related diseases, while it improves alertness and endurance.